Creation

Romans 1:20, “ For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that people are without excuse.” God created everything, and because people can clearly see these things, they have the no reason to doubt the fact that not only did God create them all, but that he exists.

Paul is telling about how God “discloses something of his existence and nature to all people in the created world” (Moo, 60). Men and women have been on the earth since the beginning of time, every day they are surrounded by Gods creation, it is up to them if they decide to believe in it, or not.

 

Sin

“For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord” Romans 6:23. This verse is not solely talking about immediate death, but also the lack of freedom that there is not believing in Jesus. The ultimate consequence to anyone is not only not spending eternity in heaven, but all that comes along with hell. Hell was not created for us, but because of sin, it is a fact that many have to deal with.

There is also the consequence of not living in the blessing of God. For example, if I know that God has a call on my life and make the choice to not do it, I know that God will still do great works through me, but it is not as great as what it could have been. As Christians, we know that once you start to head down the path of sin it is not always easy to change directions, nor is it always easy to take the righteous road, but it is always worth it.

missing the mark

Salvation

Romans teaches us that the only way to become a Christian is to, “believe in the Lord Jesus” (Moo, pg. 206). Jesus came to give all people a chance at salvation. We did not deserve what was done for us, but that is why He did it. Jesus loves us so much that he died as a sacrifice for our sins. “Therefore, since we have been justified through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ,” Romans 5:1. “Justification reminds us that our standing with God is by grace and that thankfulness should be the hallmark in all our dealings with him” (Moo, 57).

God, who declared us righteous, instantly justified us. Sanctification is something different, this includes becoming holy and set apart for God’s work. Philippians 2:13, “for it is God who works in you to will and to act in order to fulfill his good purpose.” Sanctification is taking someone who has already been justified, and that they are changed into someone who is more Christ-like. Sanctification is a process that happens over time and only happens after someone has accepted Christ, but declares that they not only want to become more holy but that they want to be called to do God’s work.

 

Eschatology:

Romans main theme is to not only present the gospel but to give God’s plan of salvation and how it is for all people. Not just the Jew, nor just the Gentiles. Romans 10:9 says, “if you declare with your mouth, “Jesus is Lord,” and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.” This is directed at all people and affirms that if you trust God with all everything that you have, you will not regret it.

This was an important reminder for the Jews and Gentiles, who at this time had their own issues, the Jews thinking that they were guaranteed salvation and the Gentiles who were a majority in the church at that time. This is an extremely important message, there are so many people who believe that they are either not worthy of God’s love, or that it is not for them.

 

Ethics:

Christians are to live a life that is not only pleasing to God but one that is to glorify the kingdom of God. “All of our life is to be a continuous worship of the God who created and redeemed us” (Moo, pg. 398). This is not just worshiping as a group that we partake in once a week on a Sunday morning, but this is personal daily worship. This is not to say that meeting together as the body is not important, because it is. This is also personal time out of the day to enter the presence of God.

This is not just limited to worship, but anything that is filling our thoughts and renewing our minds with things that are pleasing to Him. We are not to conform to the ways of the world, which in current times is not always easy, and will just continue to get harder.

“Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship. Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—his good, pleasing and perfect will” Romans 12:1-2.

Everything we do is to be a service to God, this could be not only in actual acts we are committing to broaden the kingdom, but also things that we might now normal consider Christ pleasing acts. It is honoring to him when we are doing well work, even if our job is not at the church. All that we do we should do fully, we know from Revelation that God does not want us to be lukewarm, this should apply to many aspects of our lives as well.

right wrong

Theology: What does Romans teach about the nature and attributes of God?

“For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that people are without excuse” Romans 1:20. God has given proof of his existence to every person on earth. Anyone who claims that there is no proof of the existence of God is making the choice to not believe the things that they see around them. People choose to let other things become god, or idols to them.

By picking these sins they are picking the consequences that come with these choices. God has made it known that He exists, and people choose to ignore it, this is their choice. By having freewill they have the option to go down the wrong path, which will lead to destruction.

Bibliography

Parallel Study Bible. (2008). Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan.

Moo, D. J. (2000). Romans: The NIV Application Commentary. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan.